Tag Archives: james sumners

A Note About TAC Surgeons

When you start looking into a TAC, you will quickly realize that there are a few surgeons who are much more frequently mentioned than others. In the US, those are Dr. Haney, Dr. Davis, and Dr. Sumners (see The Big Three for contact info). When I got my TAC in 2012, all three were equally popular. Since then, Dr. Davis has semi-retired, and more women are seeing Dr. Haney, so the commentary is very much skewed toward Dr. Haney at the moment. While these three doctors have some differing opinions, they are all essentially equally experienced, and all have the same very high success rates. As far as the Big Three go, you’re in good hands all around, but I’ve been hearing some disturbing comments to the effect that Dr. Davis (or Dr. Sumners, or any other doctor) does it “wrong,” and therefore their TACs fail more often. That’s pure nonsense, so if you hear such a thing, don’t let it worry you.

My real point here is that there is no “right” or “best” surgeon, only the best one for you. If you have time, shop around. See who your insurance covers, and figure out if you can or want to travel. There are a lot of things to consider when you choose your surgeon. Here are a few:

  • How far are you willing to travel?
  • Does he or she accept your insurance?
  • How much experience does he or she have?
  • Does he or she prefer laparoscopic, traditional, or robotic assisted laparoscopic? (If you have a preference.)
  • What type of material does he or she prefer to use?
  • What are his or her stats? Success rate?
  • How comfortable are you with him or her?
  • Will he or she be available to answer questions after surgery/during pregnancy? Will he or she consult with your OB/MFM/perinatologist?
  • Does he or she offer an out-of-pocket rate? (if your insurance will not cover the procedure, you may save money by traveling cross country or even out of country to a doctor who offers an at-cost option)

These are all questions you’ll need to ask yourself and your doctor. As far as experience goes, you’ll have to remember that not all doctors can have 20+ years of experience placing TACs. Some of them will be less experienced, and that’s okay. With several of our beloved TAC doctors nearing retirement, more and more women will have to see these less experienced surgeons, which, of course, is how they gain experience. Also, no two doctors do any procedure the exact same way. They each put their own spin on it, and are constantly trying to improve their own performance. Some use mersilene, some use neonatal tubing. Some place one band, some place more. There are a hundred variations, and no “right” version. We all want the very best doctor when our baby’s lives are at risk, but placing a TAC is actually a relatively simple procedure. If you find yourself in a situation where it makes sense to you to see a surgeon with less experience, there might be some additional things to think about. Personally, if I were going to have my TAC placed by a newer surgeon, I would want 1) a traditional open placement, and 2) an in-pregnancy placement. Here’s my reasoning: 1) a traditional placement allows an inexperienced surgeon a more open field and better visualization. He or she can feel the tension of the band and the knot. 2) This one seems counter-intuitive, but according to at least one study, it’s more difficult to get the correct tension on the band when placing it on a non-pregnant cervix. Since the cervix swells during pregnancy, placing it in-pregnancy means that you already know what size it will be. Placing it before than can lead to the band being too loose or too tight, both of which can cause the TAC to fail. These are probably more cautious than necessary, and if your convenient local doctor only does pre-pregnancy lap-TACs, you will do just fine. Going with the method your doctor feels most comfortable performing is probably more important than any specific type of placement. If you have any questions, please feel free to email me (Jill) at tac.questions@gmail.com.

The Big Three

Here’s the most basic contact information for the big three TAC doctors in the US. I’ll keep updating this post as I get new information. If you are specifically looking for a doctor in California, I keep a list of all of the doctors I know of who do TAC/TVCIC in the state, and everything I know about them. Email me at tac.questions@gmail.com for more information.

Arthur Haney
Pre-pregnancy and in-pregnancy TAC, placed traditionally (laparatomy, no laparoscopy)

Currently practicing in Chicago.

ahaney@babies.bsd.uchicago.edu

Center for Reproductive Medicine and Fertility
333 S. Desplaines Street
Suite 201
Chicago, IL 60661
Office: (773) 702-6127
Appointments: (773) 702-5161

The University of Chicago Medicine
5841 S. Maryland Avenue, MC 2050
Chicago, IL 60637

George Davis
Pre-pregnancy and in-pregnancy TAC, placed traditionally and laparoscopically via DaVinci robot; In-pregnancy TVCIC

Dr. Davis has retired, sadly, and is no longer practicing in either New Jersey or Tennessee.

askdrdavis@aol.com

 

 

James Sumners
Pre-pregnancy and in-pregnancy TAC, placed traditionally and laparoscopically via DaVinci robot; In-pregnancy TVCIC

Currently practicing in Indianapolis.

james_sumners@yahoo.com
FB: https://www.facebook.com/DrJamesSumners

Center for Prenatal Diagnosis
8081 Township Line Rd, Indianapolis, IN 46260
(317) 415-8070

Keep in mind, there are other very good surgeons who place the TAC and TVCIC. These three have the most experience of them all, but that doesn’t mean you have to see one of them. Also, please remember that all three of these surgeons are incredibly busy. I have no idea how they do all the work that they do, let alone have a life. They save hundreds of babies every year, so don’t get too frustrated if they don’t get back to you immediately, or even if you don’t get a response. It’s not because they don’t care. They care so much and they help such a huge number of women that sometimes emails or phone calls slip through the cracks. I promise you, they’re doing their best. If it’s critical that you reach them as soon as possible, usually calling is a better option.